Human Rights in Bahrain

One of the Arab world’s most prominent defenders of human rights has been detained in Bahrain — for a tweet. 

Dozens of civil society organizations have demanded that Bahrain release Nabeel Rajab, the President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights. Since the Arab Spring, Bahrain’s monarchy has clamped down severely on human rights. Rajab’s arrest this month only continues a pattern of persecuting political dissidents, including activist Zainab Al-Khawaja and photographer Hussain Hubai.

Despite clear human rights violations, the US, UK and other Western states remain close allies of Bahrain. It’s time we call on Bahrain’s diplomatic partners to publicly demand the release of these political prisoners! 

Go here to read a letter demanding his release: http://bchr.hopto.org/en/node/7109

After the US dropped thousands of tons of depleted uranium weapons on Iraq, cancer rates have spiked. In Basra, childhood leukemia rates doubled. Our allies at the Center for Constitutional Rights are helping lead a charge to get the US to account for its toxic weapons use. For years the US has blocked international efforts to study the effects of depleted uranium. It’s time that changed!Go here to demand the US drops its opposition to studying the toxic effects of depleted uranium weapons: http://act.rootsaction.org/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=10503&track=CCR20141016&tag=CCR20141016And read this affecting op-ed from an Iraq veteran exposed to depleted uranium in Fallujah. http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/218790-veteran-seeks-answers-on-depleted-uranium

After the US dropped thousands of tons of depleted uranium weapons on Iraq, cancer rates have spiked. In Basra, childhood leukemia rates doubled. 

Our allies at the Center for Constitutional Rights are helping lead a charge to get the US to account for its toxic weapons use. For years the US has blocked international efforts to study the effects of depleted uranium. It’s time that changed!

Go here to demand the US drops its opposition to studying the toxic effects of depleted uranium weapons: http://act.rootsaction.org/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=10503&track=CCR20141016&tag=CCR20141016

And read this affecting op-ed from an Iraq veteran exposed to depleted uranium in Fallujah. http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/218790-veteran-seeks-answers-on-depleted-uranium

An important reminder from the Global Fund for Women: Creative Voices:"60% of India’s population and 70% of women don’t have access to a toilet. Lack of access to toilets causes girls aged 12 to 18 to miss around five days of school per month."In this film Apna Haq featured in #EqualityIs, created by young women from the slums of New Delhi, we hear how lack of access to safe, sanitary, and sufficient public toilets affects their daily lives, and we learn more about the amazing project that empowered them to create the film and become leaders and advocates in their community: http://imaginingequality.imow.org/content/apna-haq-our-right.

An important reminder from the Global Fund for Women: Creative Voices:

"60% of India’s population and 70% of women don’t have access to a toilet. Lack of access to toilets causes girls aged 12 to 18 to miss around five days of school per month.

"In this film Apna Haq featured in #EqualityIs, created by young women from the slums of New Delhi, we hear how lack of access to safe, sanitary, and sufficient public toilets affects their daily lives, and we learn more about the amazing project that empowered them to create the film and become leaders and advocates in their community: http://imaginingequality.imow.org/content/apna-haq-our-right.

This is NOT what conservation should look like! In the name of preserving “protected areas” in Cameroon, environmental giant WWF has been responsible for the forcible removal of indigenous Baka people from their homelands. The WWF funds Cameroonian forces that have reportedly “beaten” and “tormented” tribespeople who depend on their ancestral lands to subsist.Indigenous people should be helping to lead conservation efforts, not getting trampled underneath them. Follow this link to help demand the WWF ends its abuses in Cameroon:http://www.survivalinternational.org/emails/southeast-cameroonRead more here:http://www.survivalinternational.org/news/10456

This is NOT what conservation should look like! 

In the name of preserving “protected areas” in Cameroon, environmental giant WWF has been responsible for the forcible removal of indigenous Baka people from their homelands. The WWF funds Cameroonian forces that have reportedly “beaten” and “tormented” tribespeople who depend on their ancestral lands to subsist.

Indigenous people should be helping to lead conservation efforts, not getting trampled underneath them. 

Follow this link to help demand the WWF ends its abuses in Cameroon:
http://www.survivalinternational.org/emails/southeast-cameroon

Read more here:
http://www.survivalinternational.org/news/10456

The Look of Silence: Accounting for US-backed Genocide

From 1965 to 1967, the US-back Suharto regime in Indonesia killed as many as a million political dissidents and ethnic minorities — as the 2012 film “The Act of Killing” viscerally documented. The episode was one of the most egregious examples of the US supporting brutality in the name of anti-communism, yet it’s unknown to most Americans. 

In conjunction with director Joshua Oppenheimer’s new film “The Look of Silence,” CoR ally East Timor and Indonesia Action Network is demanding that the US government acknowledge its role in the genocide and declassify documents relating to it.

This wouldn’t bring back the victims of Suharto, but it would be a major step toward accountability. Please follow the link below to lend your support! 

Petition: http://www.change.org/p/sign-now-u-s-release-the-records-acknowledge-u-s-role-in-1965-66-mass-violence-in-indonesia

Film: http://thelookofsilence.com/

Learn more about hip-hop in Kashmir by checking out the trailer for “Take It in Blood: A Film About MC Kash”! 

This is an important and well-made documentary about hip-hop as a form of social and creative resistance in Kashmir. It follows MC Kash, who raps about the occupation, disappearances, and violence in Kashmir. 

Malala Yousafzai

Congrats to Malala Yousafzai!

"A war can never be ended by a war." Great interview with new Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Pakistani Malala Yousafzai, who shares the honor with Indian youth activist, Kailash Satyarthi. Malala discusses how drones may kill their target, but in response, thousands of people rise against it, and “more terrorism occurs.” She stresses that “the best way to fight againast terrorism is through peaceful means.” She also explains how it is the Taliban that are afraid of her, not she of the Taliban. It is their violence that reveals their fear. 

http://www.cbs.com/shows/cbs_this_morning/video/A2BTkvrWMToRZGEBAZqDdQHLjsil57hT/malala-fearless-teen-leads-fight-for-global-education/

If you’re in NYC, check out A REQUIEM FOR SYRIAN REFUGEES, showing at the Quad Cinema from Oct. 17-23!!

http://requiemsyriamovie.com/

A Requiem for Syrian Refugees is a poignant journey of survival, resilience and empowerment.

Requiem is a wrenching documentary that features epic landscapes and compelling candid testimonies of Syrian refugees. Requiem offers an unprecedented in-depth perspective on the daily lives and feelings of refugees. Requiem was shot with a crew of refugees who felt the urgency to convey their situation to the world, including Rokn, a teenage girl who is featured in the film taking photos of life in the camp to preserve the memory of their experience.

Scored to Gabriel Faure’s famous Requiem, the film is a touching portrait of the dire conditions and anxiety faced by refugees, as well as a celebration of the human spirit facing adversity. Shot on location in Northern Iraq in stark black and white, Requiem is a powerful tale of suffering and courage, a universal reminder of the civilian toll and trauma of the 21st. century wars.

Requiem is an artistic statement against indifference of the suffering of millions, a non-partisan call for humanity and compassion.

Victory: Lego Drops Shell

Wow! An awesome victory to follow up on our previous post…

Greenpeace has drawn a clear line on Arctic Drilling, and their action has gotten results!

"Lego will not renew its marketing contract with Shell after coming under sustained pressure from Greenpeace to end a partnership that dates to the 1960s.

"The environmental campaign group, protesting about the oil giant’s plans to drill in the Arctic, had targeted the world’s biggest toy maker with a YouTube video that attracted nearly 6m views for its depiction of a pristine Arctic, built from 120kg of Lego, being covered in oil.

"Initially Lego had resisted Greenpeace, arguing that it ought to deal directly with Shell, but on Thursday it will relent."

Read more!
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/oct/09/lego-ends-shell-partnership-following-greenpeace-campaign?CMP=twt_gu

At CoR, we love our political cartoonists.

Political life is often complicated. But this much is clear: the talking heads aren’t making it any better!

Congo Week

Congo Week takes place October 19th - 25th and aims to break the silence about one of Africa’s most brutal and longest-running wars.

The war in the DRC has claimed an estimated 5 million lives, many from starvation, disease and other conflict-related causes, since 1998 — more casualties than the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq combined, and more than any conflict since World War II. It is a war that the world’s largest and most expensive U.N. peacekeeping mission has failed to quell. 

Join our allies at Friends of the Congo and find an event near you!!
http://www.congoevents.org/?locale=en

“Breaking the Silence,” a video by the Cultures of Resistance Network and Friends of the Congo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiDxvt3pveA

Washington Post feature:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/world/2014/09/27/in-congo-trapped-in-violence-and-forgotten/